Pupil Progress

Objective:  To raise achievement by setting targets, utilising assessment data, tracking progress, supporting identified students and monitoring the impact of these interventions:

  • Appropriately challenging targets are set, based upon 4 levels progress, using national test data alongside school generated assessment levels/grades;
  • Teachers are able to accurately level/grade a pupil and follow robust data collection procedures;
  • Collected data is stored in a easily accessible and flexible form which ensures that it can be retrieved in a variety of useful combinations, for example in viewing the impact of provision for PP students;
  • Rigorous analysis of the data identifies underachieving individuals or groups of students at an early stage;
  • The school’s systems for accountability ensure that teachers, year leaders and departments are challenged and supported to take any necessary action;
  • The impact of interventions is easily tracked and emerging challenges are quickly identified.
  • Students are engaged in formative assessment; they know how well they are doing and what they must do to improve.

Good progress (Targets)

  • KS3 2 levels progress

o   English and maths departments to use KS2 levels to

  • identify pupils who need to narrow the gap, L4c and below, these pupils will be placed in the PLC groups for required subject and receive 10 hours (rather than 7 hours) teaching per 2 weeks.  Progress is to be monitored half termly and any pupils judged not to be making sufficient progress are to receive extra support (small group/1-2-1 withdrawal, homework club).  If a low reading age, or a CAT score of 84 or less, is hampering progress then appropriate support to be provided during assessments.
  • All other pupils to have a 2 sub-level per year progress pathway.  Progress to be monitored half termly and any pupils judged not to be making sufficient progress are to receive extra support (small group/1-2-1 withdrawal, homework club). If a low reading age, or a CAT score of 84 or less, is hampering progress then appropriate support to be provided during assessments.

o   Science and Geography to use KS2 APS as baseline marker (science will also have the TA from KS2) and then map a 2 sub-level per year progress pathway.  Progress to be monitored half termly and any pupils judged not to be making sufficient progress are to receive extra support (small group/1-2-1 withdrawal, homework club). If a low reading age, or a CAT score of 84 or less, is hampering progress then appropriate support to be provided during assessments.

o   RE and History to use English KS2 level as baseline marker and then map a 2 sub-level per year progress pathway.  Progress to be monitored half termly and any pupils judged not to be making sufficient progress to be receive extra support (small group/1-2-1 withdrawal, homework club). If a low reading age, or a CAT score of 84 or less, is hampering progress then appropriate support to be provided during assessments.

o   Art, MFL and Computing to use a baseline test to assess a pupil’s starting point and then to map a 2 sub-level per year progress pathway.  Pupils should further be identified as H (higher), M (middle) or L (lower) ability so that an individual’s progress can be judged against this category and any perceived underachievement targeted.  Progress to be monitored half termly and any pupils judged not to be making sufficient progress are to receive extra support (small group/1-2-1 withdrawal, homework club). If a low reading age, or a CAT score of 84 or less, is hampering progress then appropriate support to be provided during assessments.

o   Design Technology must level pupils for each skill/discipline.  The school’s tracker will record levels under each area food, textiles, resistant materials and graphics rather than Technology.  Pupils should further be identified as H (higher), M (middle) or L (lower) ability so that individual’s progress can be judged against this category and any perceived underachievement targeted.

o   Sport must level pupils for each activity during each year to build up a holistic picture of a pupils overall level for their subject.  The PE department’s tracker will record levels under areas such as tactical and technical skills.  The department will level pupils for their subject as a whole, using the information gathered, on the school tracker; they will baseline and monitor against a minimum of 2 sub-levels per year.

KS4 2 levels progress (This is presently under review by the Assessment Without Levels working party, changes to be implemented in September 2015)

o   All departments to use a pupil’s end of KS3 level as the baseline marker.  Students who have not made 2 levels progress in KS3 should be identified for “catch-up” intervention from the start of KS4.

o   Pupils should further be identified as H (higher), M (middle) or L (lower) ability so that an individual’s progress can be judged against this category and any perceived underachievement targeted.

o   Individual pupil targets are to be created from using a pupil’s KS2 APS and are based on pupils making at least expected progress.

o   Progress to be monitored half termly and any pupils judged not to be making sufficient progress are to receive extra support (small group/1-2-1 withdrawal, homework club). If a low reading age, or a CAT score of 84 or less, is hampering progress then appropriate support to be provided during assessments.

Monitoring progress

  • Whole school data collection, as listed in the school’s QA cycle, 6 times per year (A1, A2, Sp1, Sp2, Su1 and Su2) is linked to:

o   Year group assessment weeks;

o   Pupil progress report card to parents three times per year (Au2, Sp2 and Su2).  The final report card will include a comment written, by the form tutor, about the pupil’s general progress, behaviour and a summary of the pupil’s attendance record;

o   Year group parents’ evenings for carers to discuss pupil progress with teachers.

  • Assessment data is useless if it is not accurate, so all teachers will receive training on levelling/grading a pupil and estimating a student’s attainment. At each data collection point pupils will be given a working level/grade and an estimated ‘end of key stage’ level/grade by the class teacher.  The ‘end of key stage’ level/grade will be compared against the target level/grade to identify pupils whose progress is considered as insufficient.
  • Pupil progress will be reviewed after each collection point and interventions identified:

o   for individuals;

o   for groups of pupils with similar needs.

Targeting intervention – for individuals:

  • Identified individual students are followed-up according to the extent they are falling behind:

o   Insufficient progress in one or two subjects, the form tutor follows up;

o   Insufficient progress in three or more subjects, the student is monitored and supported by the year leader, supported by the extended leadership team for KS4 pupils;

o   All class teachers are responsible for the progress of the pupils in their teaching groups.

  • Underachieving students who have problems related either to their attendance or to circumstances, such as difficulties at home, the wrong curriculum or peer group tensions should be monitored directly by the attendance team and appropriate year leader.
  • Learning Cluster meetings with curriculum leaders, after each data collection point, to review progress and the impact of interventions:  Each curriculum leader, in turn, discusses the pupils who have not made the expected progress and the measures that have been taken to improve progress.
  • Extended leadership team meeting after each Learning Cluster meeting, to review progress and the impact of interventions:  Directors of Learning discuss the identified students and possible strategies to raise their achievement.
  • Year leaders are responsible for discussing, in detail, their year group with both staff and governors and the member of SLT with responsibility for Pastoral Pupil Progress.
  • SLT fortnightly link

Targeting intervention – for groups:

  • In the autumn term, the Deputy Head (S&A) meets with Director of KS4 to discuss the progress of Year 11 pupils.  Four groups of students are identified and key staff are assigned to work them/SLT/cause for concern meetings:

o   Group 1:  Students who are strongly expected to achieve at least five good GCSEs, including English and mathematics.

o   Group 2:  Students who are expected to achieve at least five good GCSEs, including English and mathematics, but who require encouragement to remain motivated.

o   Group 3:  Students who have the capacity to achieve five good GCSE passes but who, because of external reasons, it is considered are unlikely to be successful in attaining this target.  Reasons include poor attendance, poor behaviour and difficult home circumstances.  This group becomes a focus for the curriculum leaders; the objective is to secure these pupils eight GCSE passes, including English and mathematics, with as many higher grades as possible.  They are monitored weekly by year leaders ensuring early targeted interventions take place as required.  The Directors of Learning check the progress of all these students with the curriculum leaders each half term.  There is a focus on students likely to pass either English or mathematics but not both; extra provision is given to the weaker subject.

o   Group 4:  This is a small group of disaffected students who are strongly at risk of underachieving.  They are provided with an alternative curriculum and are the responsibility of the inclusion leader who monitors them closely.